Fall 2019 Book Catalog

August 28, 2019

Below is a first look at new and forthcoming books from RSF for Fall 2019. The list includes Status: Why Is It Everywhere? Why Does It Matter?, a study of status as a driver of inequality in America and beyond; The Company We Keep: Interracial Friendships and Romantic Relationships from Adolescence to Adulthood, which examines how young people form relationships that bridge racial divides; and Stagnant Dreamers: How the Inner-City Shapes the Integration of Second-Generation Latinos, which examines the life outcomes for second-generation Latino men living in Los Angeles. 

Two new issues of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences will also be released this fall. “Changing Job Quality: Causes, Consequences, and Challenges,” edited by economist David R. Howell and sociologist Arne L. Kalleberg, explores the changing nature of low-wage labor in the United States. “Improving Employment and Earnings in Twenty-First Century Labor Markets,” edited by economists Erica Groshen and Harry Holzer, examines the prevalence, causes, and potential solutions to modest real wage growth, rising wage inequality, and decreasing labor force participation among less-educated workers.

To request a printed copy of our Fall 2019 catalog, please contact Bruce Thongsack at bruce@rsage.org, or view the complete list of RSF books on our publications page.

Status: Why Is It Everywhere? Why Does It Matter?
By Cecilia L. Ridgeway 

Status is ubiquitous in modern life, yet our understanding of its role as a driver of inequality is limited. In Status, sociologist and social psychologist Cecilia Ridgeway examines how this ancient and universal form of inequality influences today’s ostensibly meritocratic institutions and why it matters. Ridgeway illuminates the complex ways in which status affects human interactions as we work together towards common goals, such as in classroom discussions, family decisions, or workplace deliberations.
Read more.

 

 

 

The Company We Keep: Interracial Friendships and Romantic Relationships from Adolescence to Adulthood
By Grace Kao, Kara Joyner, Kelly Stamper Balistreri

With hate crimes on the rise and social movements like Black Lives Matter bringing increased attention to the issue of police brutality, the American public continues to be divided by issues of race. How do adolescents and young adults form friendships and romantic relationships that bridge the racial divide? In The Company We Keep, sociologists Grace Kao, Kara Joyner, and Kelly Stamper Balistreri examine how race, gender, socioeconomic status, and other factors affect the formation of interracial friendships and romantic relationships among youth. 
Read more.

 

 

Stagnant Dreamers: How the Inner-City Shapes the Integration of Second-Generation Latinos
By María G. Rendón 

A quarter of young adults in the U.S. today are the children of immigrants, and Latinos are the largest minority group. In Stagnant Dreamers, sociologist and social policy expert María Rendón follows 42 young men from two high-poverty Los Angeles neighborhoods as they transition into adulthood. Based on in-depth interviews and ethnographic observations with them and their immigrant parents, Stagnant Dreamers describes the challenges they face coming of age in the inner city and accessing higher education and good jobs and demonstrates how family-based social ties and community institutions can serve as buffers against neighborhood violence, chronic poverty, incarceration, and other negative outcomes. Read more.

 

 

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