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Inequality of Income and Consumption: Measuring the Trends in Inequality from 1985-2010 for the Same Individuals


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AUTHORS
Jonathan Fisher, U.S. Census Bureau
David S. Johnson, U.S. Census Bureau
Timothy Smeeding, University of Wisconsin, Madison

PUBLICATION DATE
2012

PUBLISHED IN
Working Paper

ABSTRACT
When measures of inequality and economic well-being show the same levels and trends using both income and consumption, then the conclusions on inequality are clear. When the levels and/or trends are different, the conclusions are less clear, but useful information and an avenue for future research can be provided. We examine the trend in the distribution of these measures from 1985 to 2010. We show that while the level of and changes in inequality differ for each measure, inequality increases for all measures over this period and, as expected, consumption inequality is lower than income inequality. Differing from other recent research, we find that the trends in income and consumption inequality are similar between 1985 and 2006, and diverge during the first few years of the Great Recession (between 2006 and 2010). For the entire 25 year period we find that consumption inequality increases about two-thirds as much as income inequality. We show that the quality of the CE survey data is sufficient to examine both income and consumption inequality. Nevertheless, given the differences in the trends in inequality, using measures of both income and consumption provides useful information. In addition, we present the level of and trends in inequality of both the maximum and the minimum of income and consumption.

SEE RELATED REPORTS
Social Inequality