Work in Progress

Work in Progress is an ongoing RSF blog series that highlights some of the research of the current class of Visiting Scholars. The series began in 2013. Interviews are archived chronologically below.

 

2017–2018

How Campaign Donations Influence the Congressional Economic Agenda

Jana Morgan (University of Tennessee)

When Hate Speech Leads to Violence

Richard Ashby Wilson (University of Connecticut)

Who Should Pay for College? 

Brian Powell (Indiana University)

How Magazines Helped Shape Asian American and Hispanic Identity in the U.S.

Dina Okamoto (Indiana University)

 

2016–2017

Rethinking Racial Health Disparities

James S. Jackson (University of Michigan)

The Partisan Brain

Jay Van Bavel (New York University)

Medicaid Expansion Under the Affordable Care Act

Helen Levy (University of Michigan)

Persistence and Fadeout in the Impacts of Child and Adolescent Interventions

Greg Duncan (University of California, Irvine)

Institutions, Precarious Work, and Inequality

Arne Kalleberg (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Long Run Effects of Childhood Exposure to Food Stamps 

Hilary Hoynes (UC Berkeley) ​​​

Zombie Ideas and Moral Panics

Rubén G. Rumbaut (University of California, Irvine)

 

2015–2016

From Academic Research to National Education Policy

Prudence Carter (University of California, Berkeley)

What Causes Low Voter Turnout? 

Jonathan Nagler (New York University)

Closing the Racial Wealth Gap in the U.S. 

William Darity (Duke University)

How Tax Cuts Became Central to the Republican Party 

Monica Prasad (Northwestern University)

Diversity is in the Eye of the Beholder 

Cara Wong (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

How Norms of Affluence on College Campuses Affect Inequality 

Tali Mendelberg (Princeton University)

The Historical Roots of New York City’s Growing Tech Economy 

Victor Nee (Cornell University)

How Survey Non-Responses Affect U.S. Poverty Rates and Understandings of Inequality 

James Ziliak (University of Kentucky)

 

2014–2015

The Complex History of Public Education in the U.S. 

Elizabeth Shermer (Loyola University, Chicago)

The “Neighborhood Gap” and Educational Achievement Disparities 

Sean Reardon (Stanford University)

How Federal Drug Laws Shape Local Courts and Prison Sentencing 

Mona Lynch (University of California, Irvine)

The Lens of Race 

Ann Morning (New York University)

The Clash of Professional Autonomy and Regulatory Compliance 

Susan Silbey (MIT)

Investigating the Networks that Supply Guns to Gangs 

Philip J. Cook (Duke University)

Developing a Racial Mobility Perspective for the Social Sciences 

Aliya Saperstein (Stanford University)

Quantal Response Equilibrium and the Limitations of Game Theory 

Thomas Palfrey (California Institute of Technology)

Political Participation and the Cost of Abstention 

Susan Stokes (Yale University)

Racial Passing in the U.S. and Mexico in the Early Twentieth Century 

Karl Jacoby (Columbia University)

The Role of Chinatown Bus Lines and Employment Agencies for New Immigrants 

Zai Liang (SUNY Albany)

Political Party Identification Among Latino Immigrants 

James McCann (Purdue University)

 

2013–2014

Nested Silences and the Household Economy 

Caitlin Zaloom (New York University)

How Genetics Can Enrich the Way We Study Social Inequality

Dalton Conley (New York University)

Diversity, Admissions, and Merit in the Ivy League and Oxbridge

Natasha Warikoo (Harvard University)

Disaster Recovery and the Vietnamese Community in New Orleans

Mark VanLandingham (Tulane University)

Investigating the Link between Income Inequality and Marriage Rates

Andrew Cherlin (Johns Hopkins University)

Combating Implicit Racial Bias

Stacey Sinclair (Princeton University)

How the Party of Lincoln Became the Party of the South

Doug McAdam (Stanford University)

Why Study Violence?

Lee Ann Fujii (University of Toronto)

The Limits of Self-Control and the Effects of Willpower Depletion

Roy Baumeister (Florida State University)

The Self-Sufficiency Theory of Money

Kathleen Vohs (University of Minnesota)

 

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