A Few Questions for …

A new series of brief, timely discussions with RSF authors and grantees about their research findings and policy implications.

A Few Questions for Alexes Harris about state monetary sanctions and racial and economic inequality, Part 2.

Alexes Harris is the Presidential Term Professor and Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington. Her research focuses on social inequality processes and racial and ethnic disparities and how contact with institutions impacts individuals’ life chances. In this brief interview, Harris discusses findings from “State Monetary Sanctions and the Costs of the Criminal Legal System,” which she co-edited with Mary Patillo (Northwestern University) and Bryan L. Sykes (University of California, Irvine). In this special double issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences, an interdisciplinary roster of contributors examine how financial penalties generate a plethora of collateral consequences that inextricably link monetary sanctions to broader patterns of racial and economic inequality. She is interviewed by RSF staff writer and digital content associate Jennifer Augustine.

Harris is the author of RSF book A Pound of Flesh: Monetary Sanctions as a Punishment for the Poor.

Read a transcript of the full interview here.

A Few Questions for Natasha Quadlin & Brian Powell about public opinion on who should pay for college, Part 2.

Natasha Quadlin is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research focuses on social inequality in the contemporary United States, with an emphasis on inequality in access and returns to education. Brian Powell is James H. Rudy Professor of Sociology at Indiana University. His research focuses on family, education, gender, and sexuality. In this brief interview, Quadlin and Powell discuss their new RSF book Who Should Pay? Higher Education, Responsibility, and the Public, which explores rapidly changing public opinion on who should be primarily responsible for the funding of college. They are interviewed by RSF staff writer and digital content associate Jennifer Augustine.

Quadlin will be an RSF visiting scholar during the 2022-2023 academic year. Powell was an RSF visiting scholar during the 2017-2018 academic year and is co-editor of the RSF volume Counted Out: Same-Sex Relations and Americans’ Definitions of Family

Read a transcript of the full interview here.

A Few Questions for Alexes Harris about state monetary sanctions and racial and economic inequality, Part 1.

Alexes Harris is the Presidential Term Professor and Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington. Her research focuses on social inequality processes and racial and ethnic disparities and how contact with institutions impacts individuals’ life chances. In this brief interview, Harris discusses findings from “State Monetary Sanctions and the Costs of the Criminal Legal System,” which she co-edited with Mary Patillo (Northwestern University) and Bryan L. Sykes (University of California, Irvine). In this special double issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences, an interdisciplinary roster of contributors examine how financial penalties generate a plethora of collateral consequences that inextricably link monetary sanctions to broader patterns of racial and economic inequality. She is interviewed by RSF staff writer and digital content associate Jennifer Augustine.

Harris is the author of RSF book A Pound of Flesh: Monetary Sanctions as a Punishment for the Poor.

Read a transcript of the full interview here.

A Few Questions for Natasha Quadlin & Brian Powell about public opinion on who should pay for college, Part 1.

Natasha Quadlin is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research focuses on social inequality in the contemporary United States, with an emphasis on inequality in access and returns to education. Brian Powell is James H. Rudy Professor of Sociology at Indiana University. His research focuses on family, education, gender, and sexuality. In this brief interview, Quadlin and Powell discuss their new RSF book Who Should Pay? Higher Education, Responsibility, and the Public, which explores rapidly changing public opinion on who should be primarily responsible for the funding of college. They are interviewed by RSF staff writer and digital content associate Jennifer Augustine.

Quadlin will be an RSF visiting scholar during the 2022-2023 academic year. Powell was an RSF visiting scholar during the 2017-2018 academic year and is co-editor of the RSF volume Counted Out: Same-Sex Relations and Americans’ Definitions of Family

Read a transcript of the full interview here.

A Few Questions for Greg Duncan, discussing how poverty reduction measures affect child development.

Greg Duncan is Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of California, Irvine, and an expert on economic mobility and how families, peers, neighborhoods, and public policy affect the life chances of children and adolescents. In this brief interview, Duncan discusses his work with the Baby’s First Years study, which assesses the impact of poverty reduction on family life and infant and toddlers’ cognitive, emotional, and brain development. He is interviewed by RSF staff writer and digital content associate Jennifer Augustine.

Duncan is an RSF Margaret Olivia Sage scholar and was an RSF visiting scholar during both the 2016-2017 and 2004-2005 academic years. He is co-editor of the RSF books, Whither Opportunity? (2011), For Better and for Worse (2002), Neighborhood Poverty: Volume 1 and  Volume 2 (2000), Consequences of Growing Up Poor (1999), and is co-author of the RSF book Higher Ground (2007). He is the recipient of multiple RSF grants and a frequent contributor to RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences.

Read a transcript of the full interview here.

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